The Origin of Memorial Day

The Origin of Memorial Day
Memorial Day is an American holiday celebrated the last Monday of May to honor the women and men who lost their life’s serving in the U.S. military. It originated in the years following the civil war. It became an official federal holiday in 1971 after the civil war. The Civil War claimed more life’s than any conflict in the history of the United States. Each year people pay tributes to the people who fought in the war, either it was family, friends or you want to pay tribute for them serving even if you may not know the person. It can also be a time to remember your loved ones who might have died while serving or even were retired veterans. It is also known as Decoration Day because you decorate the graves of the soldiers who died. For decades Memorial Day was celebrated on May 30th until 1968 when it was changed to the last Monday in May to give all federal employees a three-day weekend. As of traditions cities and towns across the United States have parades incorporating military personnel and veterans. Some of the biggest

parades to take place are in Chicago, New York, Washington, and D.C. Traditionally every year the President of the United States visits Arlington National Cemetery to honor all Americans that have died in war. So, Memorial Day is a holiday to honor the veterans and the men and women who served in any war that the United States have ever had. To honor them people, decorate their graves, have parades, and many other things to celebrate their loved ones, or friend’s death by serving for their country.